Tutorial: Cheap, rusted silver?

Many of us girls own a few "cheap" silver pieces.  By "cheap", I mean ones from Forever 21, H&M, Aldo, etc. These are obviously considered "fake silver" and they rust so quickly and easily!  A simple way to remove rust from cheap silver is to use toothpaste. : ) Please don't use this method on your expensive pieces... -_-'
  1. Squeeze a pea-sized amount of toothpaste onto your fingertip.
  2. Rub the toothpaste all over your silver gently.  You'll notice the rust coming off on your fingertips and you'll smell that disgusting "blood"/metal smell. Ick.
  3. Rinse the toothpaste off and VOILA! You've got brand new, shiny silver again. : )
I actually discovered this a few months ago, but didn't really have the chance to clean my earrings. Here are a couple of poor before/after pics of my Aldo earrings (taken from my Blackberry, sorry!).


For your other "better" silver, I recommend using baking soda. It really works! I tried this method out a few months ago, but didn't take any photos. Sorry!

  1. Line a bowl with aluminum foil (shiny side up).
  2. Put your tarnished silver into the bowl.
  3. Put a tablespoon of baking soda on top of the jewelry.
  4. Pour boiling water over it.
  5. Watch it fizzle and melt away the tarnish. ; )
You can find all of this on Google (like I did), but I just thought I should share it in case some people haven't thought of Googling it. :D

Oh and silver polisher always helps if you don't trust these "homemade" methods.

Hope this helps!

33 comments

  1. thanks for the tip.. i never knew you could do that with toothpaste.. i always threw away my 'junk' silver costume jewelry stuff after it tarnishes.. but now hopefully i can save some pieces!!

    love your blog :) new follower would love for you to check me out and follow too!!

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  2. Omg thank you so much for posting this up. I have necklaces that are rusting and I don't know what to do with them. ^^

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  3. Thaks so much for great tips. I usually ended up getting rid of them when they turned dark but now I know how to clean them.

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  4. My mom taught me the toothpaste trick, but they tarnish again so quickly -_-

    I never knew about the aluminum foil though. Thanks for sharing! :D

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  5. thanks for the info on this because i have lots of cheap f21 jewelry, lol!

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  6. That's awesome, I think I'll try that tonight!

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  7. ohhh thanks for this! I'm deffo going to try this when i get the time! x

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  8. Thank you!! This was just what I needed. I usually end up throwing away the rusted cheap jewelry, but I'll try the toothpaste method!! :)

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  9. Hehe, this is exactly what my mom tells me to do when my fake silver accessories start to rust :)
    Thanks for the tips!

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  10. Good post. :)

    My family are jewelers...

    That fake silver jewelry from HM etc etc... Is not even silver. It's actually made from things like lead, recycled car motors and other rusted metals.

    I wasn't going to leave a big comment about it, but it's just something that I know about so I thought I'd write about it :) :)

    You should avoid wearing any costume jewelry on your ears especially. Lead is a major component of junk jewelry and silver jewelry from India, over time if you keep wearing it, it can give you cancer.

    Also, from personal style (opinion), I feel like people should quit buying junk jewelry. If you calculate all the money spent on pieces in your jewelry collection, versus the amount you could have spent on one or 2 or three really nice, genuine pieces.. You'd be surprised.

    Also: Another fact about junk jewelry is that it's often made in small sweat shops in places like china... The kids that make it end up going blind, and get blisters on their hands. Most of them live in bunkers as well, and they get paid per MOQ. If they don't make a certain amount per day, they don't get fed or paid.

    LOL Sorry this was so long... I just thought it's interesting.

    p.s Big fashion companies like HM, forever21 etc etc etc... Are the places that are responsible for the destruction of REAL fashion and jewelry fabrication, because people would rather buy junk accessories than timeless pieces.

    xox

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  11. Great tips! I usually use the Silver cleaning stuff for my real silver, but need to try the toothpaste method for the fakes ;) xx

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  12. that's good to know because I never thought of googling it myself.

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  13. I am actually allergic to nickel so I can only wear surgical steel, platinum, or in limited cases gold in my ears. =0( I was reading Dakota's comment on bad junk jewelry and it made me sad on these types of jewelry can come from. I never even thought about it! However, even with expensive jewelry don't you run into some sort of corrupted labor in the process? I don't know much about it so I don't know. I was thinking like the blood diamonds --and WHY AM I TURNING YOUR BLOG POST INTO A SAD STORY.

    Ok, I went a little off topic haha. I was also going to mention eww I know what you mean about the metal smell ... it really smells like blood YURKEY.

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  14. thanks! great tip! i'm going to try it on my old, cheap jewelry sometime.

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  15. Thanks for this!! So so helpful!! I have plenty of rubbish fake silver stuff etc and i always end up chucking them!!
    I'm too scared with using this on real silver though, i think i'll stick to the polisher!

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  16. such a great idea!! Im going to try this out!!

    www.lovelywanderlust.com

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  17. i've done this before and it's super effective! great tip to share :)

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  18. Thanks Jessy! This is so very helpful :) I recently bought a few cheapo silver jewelry so will probably end up using your method when I need to clean them

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  19. @lisa
    Yeah I used to throw them out or donate them! Totally saves a bit of my money now.

    @Gloria
    haha That's what we get for the price we pay! At least it's temporarily fixable ^_^

    @DAKOTA
    Wow, thanks for informing me, Dakota! The comment is much appreciated so don't worry about it being "long". haha I didn't know these "fake" jewelry can affect your health.. I should research more on it. I totally agree with you on purchasing a few genuine pieces as opposed to a lot of "junk jewelry". I'll be thinking back to this comment every time I visit the jewelry departments at F21 / H&M now. LOL I've actually stopped purchasing fake jewelry for a while now..looking into more "long term" and "timeless" pieces, if you know what I'm saying. : )

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  20. @Banhannas
    I used to be allergic to some kind of jewelry material but for some reason, I can wear anything now. Weird! Dakota's comment got me thinking too! I never thought that much into it... also. I'll say it again too: The smell is SUPER horrible.

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  21. I never knew you can use toothpaste, maybe I can save a few pieces! =] Thanks for this. Normally, I can't wear anything but gold but gold hoop earrings are heavy so I just buy a bunch of hoop earrings I like and when I can't wear it anymore or when my ears start to itch really bad, I just throw them away. A good way to save them is to store them in a box or something instead of leaving it out to oxidize

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  22. cute blog! I’ll follow you!
    I have a fashion blog too, I hope u'll be one of my followers on bloglovin:-)
    thanks:-)
    VERONICA
    http://lifegivemefashion.blogspot.com

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  23. really nice, thanks ;)

    http://www.theupperfashion.com

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  24. Great post! I know that vinegar is a life saver when it comes to cleaning... ANYTHING, but it stinks so much so toothpaste is a nice change :) I go through my toothpaste really slowly, so it's good to know I can put my expired tooth paste to good use! lol.

    >> Quote: @Dakota "over time if you keep wearing it, it can give you cancer."
    It's quite commonly known that lead poisoning over time attributes to several health complications, but there's no proof that it causes cancer. Lead poisoning, however, can cause additional complications for those already suffering from cancer (among other illnesses). Before making any statements, please check your facts. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead_poisoning)

    Just thought that I'd sort that out. I get really annoyed when people claim stuff without backing it up with facts.

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  25. THANK YOU for posting this! for some reason I didn't know about the boiling water and hated SS b/c I could never get it clean ahahah I tried this this weekend and it worked!

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  26. Small bits of content which are explained in details, helps me understand the topic, thank you!

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  27. neither of these seem to work...the "bail" part of my necklace is really rusted (completely bronze) and i tried both methods but they don't work. are there other solutions (short of throwing out the necklace)?

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    Replies
    1. I'd buy an actual silver polisher then. They shouldn't cost more than 8-10 bucks at a jewelry or department store. : )

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  28. are there any polishers you'd recommend using? and would they work on fake silver?

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  29. I actually don't personally use/own one, so I can't say which brands are good. I have, however, attempted to use a polisher on fake silver and it gave a bit of a yellowish-silvery tone. I think it was because my necklace was REALLY rusted and dark though.

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  30. Also, I try storing my silver pieces in boxes or little dust bags when I can. I think this preserves its shine and it won't rust as quickly. : )

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  31. OMG!!! I had no idea that I can use toothpaste in order to clean my favorite silver rings! Thank you so much sor sharing this amazing tip here! Regards! Church End Carpet Cleaners Ltd.

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